All about papercrete: And other alternative building materials

All about papercrete: And other alternative building materials

All about papercrete: And other alternative building materialsAuthor(s): Charmaine Taylor

Publisher: Taylor Publishing and Elk River Press (2001)

ASIN: B0006RPWGO

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Papercrete is an IDEA , a gift, a new (old) way to look at alternative building materials. By taking unwanted newspapers, discarded cardboard, old phone books, pizza boxes and junk mail you can help eliminate landfill waste and build anything from garden pottery and outdoor furniture, up to a full sized house! This book describes all known methods and practices using Papercrete.

“Papercrete” has been rediscovered about every 30 years. In 1948 an Idaho man, Walt Friberg turned cement, sawdust and diatomaceous earth into crisp building blocks for his home, and went on to help more than 30 others construct their homes. In 1978 Mother Earth news reviewed his still functional home and tried to re-promote the mix. But the Idaho governement-funded study support money dried up and another 30 years went by until Ken Kern experimented with sawdust and clay again.

You’ll read about the latest three “inventors” working with papercrete, and learn how individuals are experimenting and building. Complete houses have been built already, along with offices, privacy walls, workshops and other structures. Small projects like garden pottery (also called Tufastone- with specialized recipes) are easy to make. Mixing instructions and formulas are given, as well as descriptions for mixer construction and alternative options.This version has close up photos of Mike McCain’s new scissor blades and mixer design.

The book also includes descriptions of building experiments with woodchips, sawdust, peat moss, hemp, lime, weeds, EPS and paper adobe, which can be used just like papercrete. This is NOT a housebuilding how- to , but it will get you started on construction ideas away from traditional stick built housing. Papercrete mixes can be used for wall insulation, for sturdy interior plaster over adobe and other materials, as bricks for wall infill, as a slipform pour to build walls, as a poured floor or ceiling, and more, such as the outdoor garden bench I built.

You can begin by making test bricks and plasters using kitchen tools, and experiment on a small scale. Then move on to construct a simple privacy wall, a shed, doghouse, or other small project. 75+ pages with black & white photos and illustrations, tips and advice. Includes emails with pertinent information, and interviews with people who are building with this material, plus comments on building with paper adobe, and earth friendly materials from inventor Sean Sands and Mike McCain.

Book FORMAT: This is a high quality, xerographic document, comb bound, 75+ pages with black & white photos and illustrations. Includes floppy disks with color photos, sites and more papercrete information. If you want to try similar papercrete recipes on a small scale-sucessfully- get Making Concrete Garden Ornaments #1078, beautiful color photos of projects you can try in a weekend, for very little money.

Cordwood Construction: A Log End View

Cordwood Construction: A Log End View

Cordwood Construction: A Log End ViewAuthor: Richard C. Flatau

Publisher: Richard Flatau; Rev ed edition (January 1, 1988)

Paperback: 122 pages

ASIN: B0006YJ9CA

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Cordwood Construction: A Log End View , is a great, smaller book on how to build a cordwood home, by author/builder Richard Flatau.

158 b/w photos,diagrams, and formulas; design ideas and good information on all aspects of constructing a home, with tips, and resources for the do-it-yourselfer. Sections on mortar mixers, types of wood, insurance, how to be mortgage free. And what Richard says he’d do differently from his 20 years experience!

Build Your Own Stone House: Using the Easy Slipform Method

Build Your Own Stone House: Using the Easy Slipform Method

Build Your Own Stone House: Using the Easy Slipform Method Author(s): Karl Schwenke, Sue Schwenke

Publisher: Storey Books

Paperback: 176 pages

ISBN: 0882666398

ISBN-13: 978-0882666396

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The simple and functional beauty of a well-built stone house never seems to go out of style. Nearly twenty years after Karl and Sue Schwenke first constructed their Vermont home, their classic book has been revised, updated, and reissued for a new generation of readers.

Using the same easy “slipform” method of construction, the Schwenkes have over the years added to their original stone house and built barns and other structures. And their book is still the best hands-on source available for people interested in building a stone house “from the ground up.”

Build Your Own Stone House features straightforward and complete instructions on a variety of topics, including:

— The materials – stone, sand, cement, and others

— How and where to site your stone house

— Excavating the site, estimating the materials needed, and figuring the ground load

— Setting up, using, and removing the forms

— Pouring piers, footings, and basement walls

— Building the stone walls, corners, and door and window openings

— Constructing the floors, ceilings, and roof

— Building your own fireplace

Clear illustrations and useful tables round out the book, which also includes all-new information on the best options and materials for insulating your home.

About the Author

Karl Schwenke is a professional writer who lives with wife Sue on a farm in Newbury, Vermont, where they have raised strawberries, pigs and hay among other crops. Together, this couple has written the book Build Your Own Stone House, and Karl wrote the Storey title Successful Small-Scale Farming. His other work includes Sierra North and Sierra South from Wilderness Press, an organization in Berkeley, California, that he co-founded after graduating from college. Karl has also written In a Pig’s Eye (Chelsea Green Publishing).

Sue Schwenke is a teacher who lives with husband Karl on a farm in Newbury, Vermont, where they have raised strawberries, pigs and hay among other crops. Together, this couple has written the book Build Your Own Stone House.

Building with Stone

Building with Stone

Building with StoneAuthor(s): Charles McRaven, Chandis Ingenthron (Illustrator)

Publisher: Storey Publishing, LLC (January 8, 1989)

Paperback: 192 pages

ISBN: 0882665502

ISBN-13: 978-0882665504

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April 17, 1998

An introduction to the art and craft of creating stone structures: acquiring stone, tools, and step-by-step instructions.

Concrete and steel may weigh as much, but nothing can rival stone for its beauty and durability. Building With Stone is an introduction to the art and craft of creating stone structures and projects by a man who has made stonework his vocation.

Throughout the book is Charles McRaven’s stonebuilding philosophy — that careful craftsmanship and time well spent during construction will repay itself many times over. The physical challenges will be offset by tremendous satisfaction and the knowledge that long after the builder is gone, the structure will stand as a personal and historical monument.

Based on years of experience, this book will educate the novice and inspire the seasonal artisan. A stonebuilder at any level will learn how to evaluate each stone and undertake each step in the procedure with an eye toward aesthetics and useful permanence.

In addition to introductory material on acquiring stone and what tools will be necessary, there are chapters with step-by-step instructions on how to build:

— walls

— buttresses

— stone fireplaces

— a barbecue pit

— a stone dam

— a stone bridge

— a spring house

— even a home or barn

The final chapter is on proper restoration techniques for stone structures.

Not just a how-to book, but also a good read, Building With Stone is sure to be a reference book and constant companion for all manner of stone journeymen, and will prove to be as enduring a volume as the structures it recommends.

About the Author

Charles McRaven is a stonemason and blacksmith, nationally known for building and repairing dozens of stone structures and log homes. He has written extensively on stone, including the books Building with Stone and Stonework, and articles for Country Journal, Fine Homebuilding, and many regional magazines. He lectures and conducts workshops and private courses in stone construction. Charles lives in Virginia.

Customer Comments

from Toronto, Canada , March 12, 1998
Introduction to Traditional Stone Masonry
This is an excellent first book for those who want to learn about building with stone as an old-world craftsman, rather than a money-hungry contractor or assembly-line modern mason. Charles McRaven does not fill his book with theory, but with practical methods and ideas which are true to proper masonry techniques but allow even the most novice to begin to lay stone right away. The anecdotal style of this book makes it an easy read, and inspires confidence to pick up that trowel for the first time!

Thatching and Thatched Buildings

Thatching and Thatched Buildings

Thatching and Thatched BuildingsAuthor: Michael Billett

Publisher: Robert Hale & Company (May 1998)

Paperback: 224 pages

ISBN: 0709062257

ISBN-13: 978-0709062257

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This definitive book on thatching and thatched buildings in rural Britain costitutes an authoritative reference guide. It contains masses of practical information and advice for all those who live in thatched houses or who are contemplating buying one. In addition, it makes fascinating reading for everyone interested in this aspect of our rural heritage. Michael Billett guides the reader through the development of thatching through the ages, the materials used, and the various types of buildings covered by thatch which can still be seen today. He describes the skilful and artistic work required to produce the beauty and charm of a thatched roof, and considers the advantages and disadvantages. Also included is a chapter which gives advice on costs, including maintenance and insurance, and modern trends, such as the use of thatch for modern houses. As well as practical advice Thatching and Thatched Buildings also includes descriptions of over five hundred of the most attractive thatched villages, many of which appear as illustrations in the delightful book.

 

The Slate Roof Bible

The Slate Roof Bible

The Slate Roof BibleAuthor(s): Joseph Jenkins

Publisher: Chelsea Green Pub Co

Paperback: 296 pages

ISBN: 0964425807

ISBN-13: 978-0964425804

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The Slate Roof Bible gives a concise history of the slate industry on both sides of the Atlantic, and the types and colours of slates to be found. Although the author is American, he is descended from Welsh migrs who left with the collapse of the Welsh slate industry around the turn of the century, and this is reflected in the early chapters. The later chapters cover in some depth the design, installation, and maintenance of slate roofs. Also covered are tools, safe working practices, and important details on chimneys, flashings and gutters. This is well done, with clear illustrations and photos – an excellent example of how to produce a practical guide. The first book to be written on the subject of slate roofs since 1926. — The Permaculture Magazine Information Service [England]
The Slate Roof Bible is a fine book, filled with fascinating information about slate: its history, the industry, and the way to work with it properly.” “I’ve been working with slate for a long time; still, I learned from this book some valuable hints and techniques that I’ve been able to put into practice.” — Fine Homebuilding, July 1998

“Five years of meticulous research, thousands of miles traveled to slate quarries all over the world, particularly Wales, has produced The Slate Roof Bible – and a surprise. This book, potentially tedious reading, is instead a delight. Full of history, lore, and useful advice, Jenkins has written a fascinating book, spiced it with humor and warmed it with his own passion for the subject.” — Doylestown Intelligencer Record [Philadelphia]

“Jenkins tells his tale with pizazz and rollicking humor, offering anecdote after anecdote about what people do, and do not do, to their slate roofs.” — Boston Sunday Globe

From the Publisher

Jenkins Publishing is proud to announce that The Slate Roof Bible was presented with the prestigious National Roofing Contractors Association 2001 GOLD CIRCLE AWARD FOR EXCELLENCE IN THE ROOFING INDUSTRY. One such award is given annually within the 4,700-member international trade association in the “SERVICE TO THE INDUSTRY” category.
Stonework: Techniques and Projects

Stonework: Techniques and Projects

Stonework: Techniques and ProjectsAuthor(s): Charles McRaven, Elizabeth McHale

Publisher: Storey Publishing, LLC (January 10, 1997)

Paperback: 192 pages

ISBN: 0882669761

ISBN-13: 978-0882669762

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No building material rivals stone for beauty, permanence and enduring popularity. If you’re lucky, stone can be found right on your building site. Builder Charles McRaven uses the benefit of his 50 years of stonework experience to inform, entertain and inspire. He helps even first time builders comprehend the intricacies of working with different stone types, choosing the most suitable stone and working with recycled stone. You’ll learn about handling, cutting and shaping. The book offers detailed descriptions for several projects including basic walls, retaining walls, entryways, arches, steps and bridges. In addition to the outdoor projects, there is a small section on using stone indoors for a veneer wall and a hearth. Clearly written and well illustrated, Stonework will help you discover the lasting satisfaction of working with stone.

The publisher, Storey Books , April 17, 1998

Complete, fully illustrated step-by-step instructions for 22 attractive projects including garden paths, and walls, porches, seats, waterfalls, and even a bridge. You’ll also learn how to use different types of stone, and cutting and shaping techniques. Two-color. Line drawings.

Customer Comments

J. Owens from Wilmington, Delaware, USA, January 19, 1998 Excellent primer for confident home-improvers
Compared to other how-to books in the category, McRaven makes the reader feel very capable of completing the projects without dumbing down the material. Let’s face it- stonework is somewhat intimidating. By adding some easy jobs like the stone birdbath-fountain, you can build confidence for bigger things. I’m ready for spring!!

Straw Bale Building: How to plan, design and build with straw

Straw Bale Building: How to plan, design and build with straw

Straw Bale Building: How to plan, design and build with strawAuthor(s): Chris Magwood and Peter Mack

Publisher: New Society Publishers (July 1, 2000)

Paperback: 256 pages

ISBN: 0865714037

ISBN-13: 978-0865714038

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This book is an essential addition to your straw bale library. Unlike other books on the topic, this material addresses the unique issues of building in northern climates. Straw bale builders, Peter Mack and Chris Magwood provide all the nitty-gritty, how-to-build-it information. They know the many unique construction issues faced by bale builders, including developing plans and budgets, picking the perfect bales, the golden principles of bale stacking, roofing, plumbing, electrical, as well as dealing with building codes and inspectors.

Peter Mack and Chris Magwood are professional bale house builders. Together they have constructed fifteen straw bale houses and structures. They teach a popular, on-going straw bale building workshop in Ontario, Canada.

256 pages, 2000

Timber-Frame Home: Design, Construction, Finishing

Timber-Frame Home: Design, Construction, Finishing

Timber-Frame Home: Design, Construction, FinishingAuthor(s): Tedd Benson

Publisher: Taunton Press

Hardcover: 234 pages

ISBN: 1561581291

ISBN-13: 978-1561581290

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Publication date: May 1997

Author, teacher, and master craftsman Tedd Benson shows readers how to plan a timber-frame home to meet their own needs and concerns. Tedd Benson can be seen on the PBS series This Old House. 97 color photographs and 140 drawings. –This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title. Synopsis: Built for modern lifestyles, today’s timber-frame homes feature open spaces, durable craftsmanship, and an accent on comfort. This book provides a comprehensive reference to timber-frame house design, written by one of the nation’s foremost builders of this type of house. 145 color photos. 130 drawings.

Customer Comments

This is a wonderful book about timber frames. As an architect i can say this book is perfect from every aspect. Complete and understandable for every kind of readers. It gives a lot of important design and technical information in a form of an artistic photo album.

Build a Classic Timber-Framed House: Planning & Design/Traditional Materials/Affordable Methods

Build a Classic Timber-Framed House: Planning & Design/Traditional Materials/Affordable Methods

Build a Classic Timber-Framed House: Planning & Design/Traditional Materials/Affordable MethodsAuthor(s): Jack A. Sobon

Publisher: Storey Books

Paperback: 208 pages

ISBN: 0882668412

ISBN-13: 978-0882668413

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The timber-framed home is attractive, affordable, and easily expanded to meet the needs of a growing family. With the step-by-step instructions in this book you can build your own classic timber-framed house — one that’s enduring, and features a level of craftsmanship rare in modern construction. Following the traditional “hall-and-parlor” home design, architect and builder Jack Sobon carefully and clearly explains finding the ideal building site; creating the master plan; selecting the best tree species; hewing and milling timbers; assembling the frame; installing wall sheathing, windows, and doors; designing and finishing the interior; expanding on the plan.

One of the best-known and most distinctive figures in the timber-framing revival, Jack Sobon knows how to make home building affordable with economical hand tools, by taking control of the processing of building materials, and through using local inexpensive supplies.

The basic house design of this book is easily adapted to meet different needs. Sobon’s practical advice incorporates the latest knowledge on building a healthy house, integrating natural systems, and finding effective home heating solutions.

Booklist:

Sobon outlines a unique craft that is part conventional furniture building, part home construction. In timber frame construction, there’s a minimum of metal fasteners (nails, nuts, bolts, etc.), and wood is joined by many of the basic joints (for example, the mortise and tenon, the dovetail) traditionally used in making furniture. Knowing that one’s home is put together by a variety of pins, slots, and notches may not be reassuring to most, but be assured that timber framing is an old technique that produces very solid structures. It does, however, require quite a lot of timber, since main beams, for instance, can be as much as eight-inches square; the various cuts must be made to rather close tolerances; and the way the timbers are harvested and sawn will have great effect on how they (and the building) respond when exposed to moisture and cold. Although the book’s sample project and copious illustrations do enlighten the initiate, it’s possible to come away feeling that a month-long class on the subject might provide a better education. Still, this is an excellent how-to. Copyright© 1994, American Library Association. All rights reserved –This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

The publisher, Storey Books , 04/17/98:
Using actual plans, the book shows how to build a classic hall-and-parlor home. Includes photos and line drawings.