The Timeless Way of Building

The Timeless Way of BuildingAuthor(s): Christopher Alexander

Publisher: Oxford Univ Press

ISBN: 0195024028

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The Timeless Way of Building

A breathtaking and profound book. It is amazing how a book that propounds revolutionary architectural theory has stirred up the computer software industry. This deeply philosophical book, which is very practical and rigorous, lays the foundation for developing pattern languages. The book is all about a common language that can be shared to build artifacts that are alive. It stresses that a design should always concentrate on the whole and not on assembling parts. It also shows the power of distributed processing, if you will, as against centralized processing. All the great principles have one thing in common. They are simple. And, after one realizes such a simple but profound principle, one can not stop wondering how one survived without its knowledge. This book gives that feeling. If you are involved in architecture of any sort- buildings, software, organization or even politics- this book is a must for you.

The Natural House

Author(s): Dan Chiras

ISBN: 0890132578

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Gracious, comfortable and ecologically-benign homes are being built all across America. You may be intrigued by solar techniques and natural materials, yet lack an overview introducing the basic choices now available, along with the pros and cons of various building options. The Natural House addresses that interest with style and substance.

This exciting new book, written by a veteran author who himself lives in a straw-bale and rammed-tire home, takes the reader on a tour of fourteen natural building methods, including straw bale, rammed earth, cordwood, adobe, earthbags, papercrete, Earthships and more. You’ll learn how these homes are built, how much they cost, and the pros and cons of each. A resource guide at the end of every chapter offers a wealth of information.

This comprehensive sourcebook offers in-depth information that will guide your search for the perfect sustainable dream home. It’s a must for builders, contractors, architects and do-it-yourselfers.

With a writing style that is clear, understandable, at times humorous, and fun to read, the author shows how we can gain energy independence and dramatically reduce our environmental impact through passive heating and cooling techniques, solar electricity, wind power and micro-hydropower. Chiras also explains safe, economical ways of acquiring clean drinking water and treating wastewater, and discusses affordable green building products.

While Chiras is a strong advocate of natural building, he takes care not to romanticize natural building techniques. He alerts readers to avoidable pitfalls, offering detailed practical advice that could save you tens of thousands of dollars, whether you’re buying a natural home, building one yourself or renovating an existing structure or considering hiring a contractor to build for you.

468 pages, 2000

The Alternative Building Sourcebook

Author(s): Steve Chappell

Publisher: Fox Maple Press, Inc.

ISBN: 1889269018

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The Alternative Building Sourcebook Natural & Traditional Building resource guide.

A unique and highly recommended addition to personal, professional, and acedemic architectural reference book collections, The Alternative Building Sourcebook will prove to be an invaluable resource for student, neophyte and even experienced architects. Of special utility are the sections devoted to internet websites and email address, subject listings, and company index.–James A. Cox — Internet Bookwatch, September 1998

Over the years as a professional timber framer, Steve Chappell of Fox Maple School of Traditional Building (the people behind Joiners’ Quarterly magazine) has met a lot of people; no small number of them offering unusual and hard-to-find goods and services of value to those interested in natural and sustainable housing. Over 900 indexed entries interspersed with photos and short articles about traditional and natural building techniques fill 140 pages. It’s fun to go through the listings, taking mental notes; stumbling across answers to arcane bits of long-term wonderings; following up on leads; finding those magic contacts that never would have been found; and knowing that the big payoff will come six months down the road when a positive need to find hemp fiberboard, seagrass carpet, or a one-man sawmill with built-in edger without delay will arise.–Mark Piepkorn — The Last Straw Journal, issue#23, Fall 1998

The SOURCEBOOK is unique among green building guides in its exclusive focus on natural building methods, such as strawbale, clay infill, cob, thatch and timber framing. Useful information on associated products, services, and tools is also provided. For builders, architects, and lay people interested in natural building, The Alternative Building Sourcebook makes an excellent reference. — Environmental Building News, April 1998

This is not just another directory of green building materials. The result is a rich compilation of helpful businesses, rounded out with instructive essays, illustrations, and sidebars. Resource categories include suppliers, publications, schools, software, videos, and workshops and conferences. I’ll be using this book for a long time.–Carol Venolia — Building With Nature, Issue#20, March 1999

Paperback 144 pages

Timber Frame Construction: All About Post and Beam Building

Timber Frame Construction: All About Post-And-Beam Building

Timber Frame Construction: All About Post and Beam BuildingAuthor(s): Jack Sobon, Roger Schroeder

Publisher: Storey Books

Paperback: 208 pages

ISBN: 0882663658

ISBN-13: 978-0882663654

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“If you’ve ever dreamed about building with timbers, this book will convince you that this method is not only beautiful and practical, but often less expensive than “stick building.” Includes dozens of illustrations and photos.” – Countryside & Small Stock Journal

If you have only dreamed about the beauty of building with timbers, this book will open your eyes. It will convince you that this method is not only practical today for homes and other buildings, but often is less expensive than “stick building.”

Timber frame builder Jack Sobon and writer Roger Schroeder offer a book for builders as well as those wishing to have the work done for them. Here is practical how-to for both beginners and experienced carpenters who want to try this method. It offers:

The basics of timber framing.

How to design for strength and beauty.

How to combine modern tools and time-tested methods.

A starter project: How to build a 12 x 16 garden toolshed.

Dozens of illustrations and photos that make it all easy to understand.

Timber-Frame Houses (Fine Homebuilding's Great Houses Series)

Timber-Frame Houses (Fine Homebuilding’s Great Houses Series)

Timber-Frame Houses (Fine Homebuilding's Great Houses Series)Publisher: Taunton Press

Paperback: 160 pages

ISBN: 156158150X

ISBN-13: 978-1561581504

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Timber-Frame Houses (Fine Homebuilding’s Great Houses Series)

Paperback
Publication date: April 1996
Traditional methods and current innovations make timer-frame building more practical than ever. Top teachers and practitioners like Tedd Benson, Jack Sobon and George Nash describe remodels and reconstructions, houses modeled after old-world sytles, and inspiring new designs with open, modern floor plans. 207 color photos.

From Library Journal

A compilation of articles from the last ten years of Fine Homebuilding magazine, this attractive volume reflects the full-scale revival of the timber-framer’s craft as applied to house construction. It features master builders like Tedd Benson, Ed Levin, and George Nash and others who have successfully integrated modern approaches with traditional craft. More than half the 30 or so articles document the design and construction of specific houses, and the remainder survey the latest methods and materials. Included are such topics as milling timbers, cutting and forming various joints, hoisting impossibly heavy frame members, and working with stress-skin building panels and other product innovations. An important addition for any library serving designers, architects, or builders (professional and amateur alike).
– Bill Demo, Tompkins Cortland Community Coll., Dryden, N.Y.
Build a Classic Timber-Framed House: Planning & Design/Traditional Materials/Affordable Methods

Build a Classic Timber-Framed House: Planning & Design/Traditional Materials/Affordable Methods

Build a Classic Timber-Framed House: Planning & Design/Traditional Materials/Affordable MethodsAuthor(s): Jack A. Sobon

Publisher: Storey Books

Paperback: 208 pages

ISBN: 0882668412

ISBN-13: 978-0882668413

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The timber-framed home is attractive, affordable, and easily expanded to meet the needs of a growing family. With the step-by-step instructions in this book you can build your own classic timber-framed house — one that’s enduring, and features a level of craftsmanship rare in modern construction. Following the traditional “hall-and-parlor” home design, architect and builder Jack Sobon carefully and clearly explains finding the ideal building site; creating the master plan; selecting the best tree species; hewing and milling timbers; assembling the frame; installing wall sheathing, windows, and doors; designing and finishing the interior; expanding on the plan.

One of the best-known and most distinctive figures in the timber-framing revival, Jack Sobon knows how to make home building affordable with economical hand tools, by taking control of the processing of building materials, and through using local inexpensive supplies.

The basic house design of this book is easily adapted to meet different needs. Sobon’s practical advice incorporates the latest knowledge on building a healthy house, integrating natural systems, and finding effective home heating solutions.

Booklist:

Sobon outlines a unique craft that is part conventional furniture building, part home construction. In timber frame construction, there’s a minimum of metal fasteners (nails, nuts, bolts, etc.), and wood is joined by many of the basic joints (for example, the mortise and tenon, the dovetail) traditionally used in making furniture. Knowing that one’s home is put together by a variety of pins, slots, and notches may not be reassuring to most, but be assured that timber framing is an old technique that produces very solid structures. It does, however, require quite a lot of timber, since main beams, for instance, can be as much as eight-inches square; the various cuts must be made to rather close tolerances; and the way the timbers are harvested and sawn will have great effect on how they (and the building) respond when exposed to moisture and cold. Although the book’s sample project and copious illustrations do enlighten the initiate, it’s possible to come away feeling that a month-long class on the subject might provide a better education. Still, this is an excellent how-to. Copyright© 1994, American Library Association. All rights reserved –This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

The publisher, Storey Books , 04/17/98:
Using actual plans, the book shows how to build a classic hall-and-parlor home. Includes photos and line drawings.

Building the Timber Frame House: The Revival of a Forgotten Craft

Building the Timber Frame House: The Revival of a Forgotten Craft

Building the Timber Frame House: The Revival of a Forgotten CraftAuthor(s): Tedd Benson, James Gruber, Jamie Page

Publisher: Touchstone (September 1, 1981)

Paperback: 211 pages

ISBN: 0684172860

ISBN-13: 978-0684172866

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For centuries, post-and-beam construction has proved to be one of the most durable building techniques. It is being enthusiastically revived today not only for its sturdiness but because it can be easily insulated, it is attractive, and it offers the builder the unique satisfaction of working with timbers. Building the Timber Frame House is the most comprehensive manual available on the technique. In it you will find a short history, of timber framing and a fully illustrated discussion of the different kinds of joinery, assembly of timbers, and raising of the frame. There are also detailed sections on present-day design and materials, house plans, site development, foundation laying, insulation, tools, and methods.