Courtyards: Aesthetic, Social, and Thermal Delight

Courtyards: Aesthetic, Social, and Thermal Delight

Author(s): John Reynolds

Publisher: Wiley; 1 edition (November 15, 2001)

Language: English

ISBN-10: 0471398845

ISBN-13: 978-0471398844
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Courtyards are special areas that allow the inside and outside to mingle; where rain, wind, daylight, darkness and sound can be showcased. Simply, they are niches of beauty and solace. Since at least 3000 B.C., courtyards have been incorporated into the architecture of the day as a significant part of the physical and cultural landscape. Today, the courtyard continues to be an evolving and popular aspect of design through which landscapers and designers can create privacy amidst increased property development.

Most people have seen the beauty of a courtyard or have experienced its social benefits, but very few studies have shown how successful courtyards are at cooling. Reynolds career-long interest in energy use, especially solar energy, is on display in the chapter on climate and comfort. Here and throughout the book, he addresses energy issues in both quality and quantity.

Courtyards presents a survey of courtyards, contemporary design guidelines and a diverse selection of examples. You will acquire a basic understanding of the balance that must exist between garden and building, including practical advice for planting.

Part One presents the characteristics of courtyards, including classifications, plants, orientation, exposure, materials and changes over time. Part Two offers a tour of some particular courtyards in Spain and Mexico, including details on thermal performance and responses to the urban environment. This section is generously supplemented with 50 color photographs. Part Three presents design guidelines, including day-night temperature ranges, zoning regulations, proportions and innovative proposals incorporating driveways and uses of rainwater.

John Reynolds is a professor emeritus of architecture at the University of Oregon. He has been actively involved in the American Solar Energy Society for many years and served as its president.

242 pages, 2002