Adding to a House: Planning, Design, & Construction

Cover, Adding to a House

Publisher: Fine Homebuilding

ISBN: 1561580724

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One of the best ways to combat urban sprawl and save money is to recycle an old home. Often older homes seem inadequate because of lack of space or facilities (such as bathrooms, offices, utility rooms, etc.). In Adding to a House, designer/builder Philip Wenz gives you the benefit of his 20 years of building experience. He explains how to:

      Evaluate a house for its addition potential, in terms of its resale value and the condition of the structure and site.
      Design the addition for continuity with the existing house.
      Avoid costly mistakes that leave the house in worse shape than when the project began.
      Accurately estimate the cost of any type of addition.
      Ensure that the addition conforms to local building codes and zoning regulations.
      Make connections between the old and new foundations, framing and roofs.

Now all the essential information about residential additions can be found in one book. 263 pages, 1995

The Owner Built Home

Cover, The Owner Built Home  - Original 1972 Edition

Author(s): Ken Kern

ISBN: 0686312201

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The Owner Built Home

10 Chapters: Building site, Planting Design, Climatology, Summer Cooling, Ventilation, Light & Shade, Central heating, Heating, Fireplac, Heat Circulatiing Fireplace,

Covers How to on: Adobe block, Pressed block (cinva ram) Rammed Earth, Stone Masonry, Masonry Block and brick, Concrete, Precast concrete panels,(tilt up concrete walls) Stone slipformss, Wood, Wood frame, Pole frame, Composite materials (early papercrete ideas), Plastics (shell & foam houses. Salvage materials(includes “zome “car tops design), Tools, Foundations, Floors, Walls, Wood floors, Masonry roofs, Stairs, Plumbing, Wiring and lighting, Light and color, DIY painting, Conclusion,110 pages, index, B&W photos and diagrams. Original book (used several in stock now.

This is the book that made Ken Kern famous! 6″x8” size, softcover. All in good or fair shape, some with underlining, marking, or scuffing as is expected from a heavily used “primer” on owner building!

The Production of Houses (Center for Environmental Structure Series)

The Production of HousesThe Production of Houses

Author(s): Christopher Alexander, Julio. Martinez, Howard Davis

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0195032233

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As an innovative thinker about building and planning, Christopher Alexander has attracted a devoted following. His seminal books–The Timeless Way of Building, A Pattern Language, the Oregon Experiment, and The Linz Cafe–defined a radical and fundamently new process of environmental design. Alexander now gives us the latest book in his series–a book that puts his theories to the test and shows what sort of production system can create the kind of environment he has envisioned.
The Production of Houses centers around a group of buildings which Alexander and his associates built in 1976 in northern Mexico. Each house is different and the book explains how each family helped to lay out and construct its own home according to the family’s own needs and in the framework of the pattern language. Numerous diagrams and tables as well as a variety of anecdotes make the day-today process clear.
The Mexican project, however, is only the starting point for a comprehensive theory of housing production. The Production of Houses describes seven principles which apply to any system of production in any part of the world for housing of any cost in any climate or culture or at any density.
In the last part of the book, “The Shift of Paradigm,” Alexander describes, in detail, the devastating nature of the revolution in world view which is contained in his proposal for housing construction, and its overall implications for deep-seated cultural change.

About the Author

Christopher Alexander, winner of the first medal for research ever awarded by the American Institute of Architects, is a practicing architect and contractor, Professor of Architecture at the University of California, Berkeley, and Director of the Center for Environmental Structure. He also wrote Notes on the Synthesis of Form.

 

Hardcover
Publication date: May 1984

How Buildings Learn : What Happens After They’re Built

Cover, How Buildings Learn : What Happens After They're Built

Author(s): Stewart Brand

Publisher: Penguin USA (Paper)

ISBN: 0140139966

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Reprint Edition
Paperback Publication date: October 1995

From Kirkus Reviews , 04/15/94:
Brand, founder of The Whole Earth Catalog and CoEvolution Quarterly, launches a populist attack on rarefied architectural conventions. A hippy elder statesman (once one of Ken Kesey’s Merry Pranksters), Brand argues that a building can “grow” and should be treated as a “Darwinian mechanism,” something that adapts over time to meet certain changing needs. His humanistic insights grew out of a university seminar he taught in 1988. Catchy anti- establishment phrases abound: “Function reforms form, perpetually,” or “Form follows funding.” Thomas Jefferson, a “high road” builder, is shown to have tinkered his Monticello into a masterpiece over a lifetime. Commercial structures, Brand says, are “forever metamorphic,” as a garage-turned-boutique demonstrates. Photo spreads with smart and chatty captions trace the evolutions of buildings as they adopt new “skins.” Pointedly, architects Sir Richard Rogers (designer of the Pompidou Centre in Paris) and I.M. Pei (the Wiesner Building, aka the Media Lab at MIT) are taken to task for designing monumental flops that deny occupants’ needs. Later sections track the social meanings of preservationism and celebrate vernacular traditions worldwide (e.g., the Malay house of Malaysia; pueblo architecture; the 18th- century Cape Cod House). Brand also documents his own unique habitats. He lives with his wife in a converted tugboat and houses his library in a metal self-storage container. Here, as throughout, Brand’s self-reliant voice rings true–that of an engaging, intellectual crank. Brand makes a case for letting people shape their own environments. His crunchy-granola insights bristle with an undeniable pragmatism. — Copyright ©1994, Kirkus Associates, LP. All rights reserved.

Synopsis:
All kinds of structures–domestic, commercial, institutional–are examined as they change with time and with varied usage in this fascinating, vividly accessible book that beckons toward a new frontier in architecture. 340 illustrations and photos.

Like people, buildings change with age, forced to adapt to the needs of current occupations. This provocative examination of buildings that have adapted well, and some that haven’t, calls for a dramatic rethinking in the way new buildings are designed, one that allows structures to grow and change easily with the environment. Photos.

Booknews, Inc. , 12/01/94:
Kind of like the theory that a literary text is never closed, but is temporarily appropriated in its reading and rereading, Brand, of Whole Earth Catalog fame, proposes that buildings adapt best when constantly refined and reshaped by their occupants, and that architects can grow from artists of space into artists of time. As a resource or just as a read, Brand shows how to work with time rather than against it. He provides loads of examples and loads of photographs and drawings. 11×8.75 Annotation copyright Book News, Inc. Portland, Or.

The author, Stewart Brand , 07/26/97:
Now a BBC TV series In July 97 the BBC aired a 6-part TV series called How Buildings Learn. I was the writer and presenter. It got lovely reviews in the Brit press. I hope it gets picked up for US broadcast. A British edition of the book (from Orion Books) came out at the same time as the TV series. It’s better manufactured than the US edition from Penguin, so the 350 photos read more clearly. You can probably get a copy from Blackwells on the Web. Maybe Amazon will pick up the Brit edition as well? However, the US edition has some harsh comments about buildings by architect Richard Rogers that were expunged from the British edition because he is aggressively litigious about all criticism.

Customer Comments

from Toronto, Canada , 10/09/97, rating=10:
excellent, thought-provoking, calm I’ve hesitated to review this book because I’m personally suspicious of glowing praise. However, this book deserves it. Brand’s starting point is the observation that most architects spend most of their time re-working or extending existing buildings, rather than creating new ones from scratch, but the subject of how buildings change (or, to adopt Brand’s metaphor, how buildings learn from their use and environment) is ignored by most architectural schools and theorists. By looking at examples (big and small, ancient and modern), Brand teases out patterns of re-use and change, and argues (very convincingly) that since buildings are going to be modified many times, they should be designed with unanticipated future changes in mind. Of course, the same is true of programs, and I found again and again that I could substitute the word program for building, and programmer for architect, everything Brand said was true of computing as well (but much better written than any software engineering polemic I’ve ever read).

04/03/97, rating=9:
Explores Architecture and Change I learned of this book while previewing a presentation by a superior software professional working to come up with some principles and ideas for building flexible systems, and whose son (an architecture student) had sent a copy to her. Several metaphors that she included, taken from the book, were so compelling I had to buy a copy immediately. The book turns out to be interesting on many levels, interesting about buildings, unintentionally full of metaphors for software geeks like me, intriguing about what happens when concrete and steel meet the realities of change and human nature. Now if I could only find a book about How People Learn…

02/16/97, rating=9:
A must for architects and preservationists This book is one of my required texts for my master’s degree in historic preservation. Preservationists are often overly concerned with restoring buildings to a specific period and this book should change their minds! The concept of a building as a living breathing CHANGING entity is something that anyone involved with buildings should take to heart. Brand’s book is well written and easy to read, and anyone who has ever been in love with a building should read it!

08/08/96, rating=8:
Very much in the tradition of A PATTERN LANGUAGE (Chris Alexander et al), about how building evolve through remodeling over the decades. Several excerpts: Art begets fashion; fashion means style; style is made of illusion; and illusion is no friend to function…. Formerly stylish clothing you can throw or give away; a building goes on looking ever more out-of-it, decade after decade, until a new skin is grafted on at great expense, and the cycle begins again–months of glory, years of shame…. Real estate is an astonishingly unexamined phenomenon. Books on the history of architecture outnumber books on the history of real estate 1,000 to 0, yet real estate has vastly more influence on the shape and fate of buildings than architectural theories of aesthetics.

A Primer on Sustainable Building

A Primer on Sustainable BuildingAuthor(s): Dianna Lopez Barnett, Dianna L. Barnett, William D. Browning

Publisher: Rocky Mountain Institute

ISBN: 1881071057

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A Primer on Sustainable Building

When people build or buy a new home, they usually think in local terms: What’s the neighorhood like, is the space adequate, can we afford it? It’s a big decision and a highly personal statement about who we are, that intersection of the American Dream and our individual vision of the good life.

But buildings are also social and environmental facts. They occupy space, consume resources, and impact the land in a significant way whether isolated on a remote hilltop or massed together in a suburban tract. A Primer on Sustainable Building is a workbook for consumers, contractors, architects, and developers who want to address these facts and create buildings that please both individuals and the environment. Rather than invent radical cures that deprive us of comfort and beauty, proponents of sustainable design (or “green development”) resurrect classic architectural principles and advocate greater sensitivity to climate, terrain, and land use alternatives. “The primary goal of sustainable design is to lessen the harm poorly designed buildings cause by using the best of ancient building approaches in logical combination with the best of new technological advances,” explains author Dianna Lopez Barnett. It’s not a new principle, just one that’s been forgotten during the last half century.

The wire-bound Primer covers everything from the principles of sustainable building through design, site selection, construction, energy use, and maintenance. It includes a helpful glossary and resource guide, and it’s short and easy to read — just the sort of thing to peruse before you hire a contractor or fire up the backhoe.

Disaster & Recovery Planning: A Guide for Facility Managers

Disaster & Recovery Planning: A Guide for Facility ManagersAuthor(s): Joseph Gustin

Publisher: Fairmont Press

Hardcover: 349 pages

ISBN: 0881734810

ISBN-13: 978-0881734812

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The key to understanding the complexities of disaster preparedness and business continuity lies in focusing upon the issue of prevention, or mitigation. The completely revised third edition of this best-selling reference speaks to the issues of prevention, as well as “controlling” the effects of a disaster on a company’s operations. Critical areas covered include contingency planning, loss prevention, facility evacuation, employee training, chain of command, checklists, computer and data protection, bomb threat response, standby power, self-inspection, and more. Topics added or expanded in the third edition include workplace violence, regulatory influence including the Disaster Mitigation Act of 2000, and effective mitigation strategies, and managing the disaster and recovery effort. Also discussed in depth is the role of the media to provide the facility manager with a framework for enlisting the media’s assistance in recovery planning. Every facility should have a copy of this important reference on hand.

6 x 9, 325+ pp., Illus., Hardcover

Community Energy Workbook: A Guide to Building a Sustainable Economy

Community Energy Workbook : A Guide to Building a Sustainable EconomyAuthor(s): Alice Hubbard

Publisher: Rocky Mountain Institute

ISBN: 1881071049

ISBN-13: 978-1881071044

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Publication date: March 1995
Community Energy Workbook : A Guide to Building a Sustainable Economy
Reduce your community’s energy consumption and improve the local economy. Drawing on the experiences of citizens around the country, The Community Energy Workbook outlines a comprehensive, step-by-step process for achieving sustainable, community-wide energy savings. This companion to The Economic Renewal Guide will help you calculate your community’s total energy bill, examine its economic and environmental implications, organize an energy town meeting, and involve the entire community in creating and implementing an energy action plan. We could forge no better energy policy than to put copies of The Community Energy Workbook on the desk of every local official and active citizen in the country.
–David Orr, author of Ecological Literacy.

1st edition (1995).
Softcover, 270 pages

Energy Conscious Design: A Primer for Architects

Author(s): John R. Goulding, J. Owen Lewis, Theo C. Steemers (Editor)

Publisher: B T Batsford Ltd

Paperback: 160 pages

ISBN: 0713469196

ISBN-13: 978-0713469196

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This book, being prepared for the Commission of the European Communities, is concerned with the idea of the urban energy efficiency as a means to provide better environmental performance. Its simplified way of presenting fundamental concepts is very convenient. What I really liked the best is that it is filled with very nice and clear figures that are self-explanatory. However, these figures are not numbered!!!, which makes it hard to link them with the text. The book is very useful for architects and architectural students.

Constructed Wetlands in the Sustainable Landscape

Constructed Wetlands in the Sustainable LandscapeAuthor(s): Craig Campbell and Michael Ogden

Publisher: Wiley; 1 edition (April 22, 1999)

Paperback: 288 pages

ISBN: 0471107204

ISBN-13: 978-0471107200

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Constructed wetlands are gaining worldwide acceptance as effective, low-cost and low-impact alternatives to unsightly, high-impact wastewater treatment facilities. The creative involvement of today’s planners, landscape architects, developers, environmental engineers and public officials is helping to maximize the potential of these wetland habitats — from their aesthetics to their multiple uses as water treatment plants, wildlife refuges and recreational or educational facilities. Yet, to date, the literature has paid no attention to these aspects, focusing instead on the technical side of wetlands construction and function.

Constructed Wetlands in the Sustainable Landscape is the first book to integrate aesthetic design and planning issues with the technical aspects of wetlands engineering. Renowned landscape architect Craig S. Campbell and engineer Michael H. Ogden clearly demonstrate how the successful development and management of multifunctional, sustainable wetland habitats depend on harnessing the knowledge and working principles of a number of disciplines. Richly illustrated with real-world case studies, the book:

 

  • Covers the concept of sustainable development and the nature of wetland processes.
  • Discusses designs for new and existing municipal and small community wastewater treatment facilities.
  • Offers calculations for designing surface and subsurface flow wetlands.
  • Provides guidance for construction and operation.
  • Contains examples of on-site planning for, and management of, stormwater renovation, single-family residential systems and multiple-use systems.
  • Examines landscape engineering and planning for ponds, urban wildlife, and ecological art.

Clearly written and accessible to nonengineers and nonscientists, Constructed Wetlands in the Sustainable Landscape is a crucial guide for landscape architects, environmental engineers, planners, developers and government officials.

Review

“This book is a valuable resource to be consulted in the early planning stages of a wetland construction project, particularly where aesthetics and social acceptance are important factors.” (Theodore J. Hogan: Environmental Practice 3(1), March, 2001)”This book addresses a broad audience: water and environmental engineers, planners, landscape architects, developers and public officials responsible for planning and environment protection. Written in a clear way, it is accessible to a wider audience than engineers and scientists, and can be a useful compliment in studying. Indeed, anyone interested in sewage treatment, water protection, landscape planning and ecology may find this book useful. Specialists may benefit from a new, broader perspective on their professional problems.” (Hydrological Sciences Journal, Feb. 2002)

Planning for Biodiversity: Issues and Examples

Planning for Biodiversity: Issues And ExamplesAuthor(s): Sheila Peck

Publisher: Island Press

Paperback: 232 pages

ISBN: 1559634014

ISBN-13: 978-1559634014

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A significant consequence of the development of natural landscapes is habitat loss and fragmentation that results in widespread loss of biological diversity. While scientists have made great strides in determining principles and concepts fundamental to preserving biodiversity, their work will have little impact unless it is understood and implemented by those who are making on-the-ground decisions about land use.”Planning for Biodiversity” provides an accessible introduction to ecological concepts for planning professionals and students. Sheila Peck explains why planners should be concerned with habitat preservation and presents practical approaches to incorporating conservation principles into planning efforts. The book.introduces a clear framework for understanding biodiversity explains concepts related to ecosystem structure and function discusses the effects of size and connectivity on habitat quality and species movement suggests conservation priorities at different scales presents elements of reserve design examines types and sources of information considers the causes of uncertainty in biodiversity planning and the need for monitoring and adaptive management.In each chapter, Peck presents case studies that explore the practical implications of the concepts examined, and provides contact information for each group involved in the case. Case studies include the Beaverhead/Deerlodge National Forest, Montana; Pinhook Swamp Linkage, northeastern Florida; National Gap Analysis Program; CALFED Bay-Delta Program, California; and numerous others. In addition, she includes planning guidelines which summarize the main points of the chapters, and a useful glossary of ecologicalterms.”Planning for Biodiversity” synthesizes and explains important ecological concepts and represents the first guide for planners that clearly details how to incorporate conservation plans into their work. Planners, landscape architects and designers, planning and design students, developers, local officials, and anyone interested in designing and developing more ecologically sound land-use projects will find the book an invaluable resource.