Mill

Cover, MillAuthor(s): David MacAulay

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Company

ISBN: 0395520193

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Reading level: Ages 9-12
Paperback October 1989

Book Description
The mills at Wicksbridge are imaginary, but their planning, construction, and operation are quite typical of mills developed in New England throughout the nineteenth century. Well-researched, ambitious, and absorbing, this is another first-rate history lesson from a practiced, perfectionist hand. — Booklist, starred review ALA Notable Book

Booklist Editors’ Choice

Horn Book Fanfare Selection

School Library Journal Best Books of the Year

Synopsis
Well researched, ambitious, and absorbing, this first-rate history lesson details the construction of a spinning mill with a good deal of social history interwoven.

Studies in Tectonic Culture : The Poetics of Construction in Nineteenth and Twentieth Century Architecture

Studies in Tectonic Culture : The Poetics of Construction in Nineteenth and Twentieth Century ArchitectureAuthor(s): Kenneth Frampton, John Cava (Editor)

Publisher: MIT Press (Trd)

ISBN: 0262061732

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Honorable Mention, 1995, in the category of Excellence in Design and Production, Professional/Scholarly Publishing Annual Awards Competition presented by the Association of American Publishers, Inc.

Kenneth Frampton’s long-awaited follow-up to his classic A Critical History of Modern Architecture is certain to influence any future debate on the evolution of modern architecture.

Studies in Tectonic Culture is nothing less than a rethinking of the entire modern architectural tradition. The notion of tectonics as employed by Frampton—the focus on architecture as a constructional craft—constitutes a direct challenge to current mainstream thinking on the artistic limits of postmodernism, and suggests a convincing alternative. Indeed, Frampton argues, modern architecture is invariably as much about structure and construction as it is about space and abstract form.

Composed of ten essays and an epilogue that trace the history of contemporary form as an evolving poetic of structure and construction, the book’s analytical framework rests on Frampton’s close readings of key French and German, and English sources from the eighteenth century to the present. He clarifies the various turns that structural engineering and tectonic imagination have taken in the work of such architects as Perret, Wright, Kahn, Scarpa, and Mies, and shows how both constructional form and material character were integral to an evolving architectural expression of their work. Frampton also demonstrates that the way in which these elements are articulated from one work to the next provides a basis upon which to evaluate the works as a whole. This is especially evident in his consideration of the work of Perret, Mies, and Kahn and the continuities in their thought and attitudes that linked them to the past.

Frampton considers the conscious cultivation of the tectonic tradition in architecture as an essential element in the future development of architectural form, casting a critical new light on the entire issue of modernity and on the place of much work that has passed as “avant-garde.”

Hardcover
430 pages

Linz Cafe

Linz CafeAuthor(s): Christopher Alexander

ISBN: 0195202635

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Linz Cafe Published 1982

Natural Energy and Venacular Architecture : Principles and Examples With Reference to Hot Arid Climates

Natural Energy and Venacular Architecture : Principles and Examples With Reference to Hot Arid ClimatesNatural Energy and Venacular Architecture : Principles and Examples With Reference to Hot Arid Climates

Author(s): Hassan Fathy, Walter Shearer (Editor)

Publisher: Univ of Chicago Pr (Trd)

ISBN: 0226239179

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The culmination of a lifetime’s design practice and environmental study, Natural Energy and Vernacular Architecture presents a master architects’ extraordinary insights into the vernacular wisdom of indigenous architectural forms that have evolved in hot arid climates.

 

This book has a traditional and philosophic view to the effects of environment on man and his architecture; this view could be affected by its authors, especially Hassan Fathy.

This book includes two parts. In the first part we can see the relationship between Man, Natural Environment and Architecture as three impressible factors. This part of book is in two chapters. In chapter one, we become familiar with relationship between environment and architecture, the effect of climate on architectural form, environment, conscious modification of microclimate and finally trends in international architecture. Chapter two includes architectural thermodynamics and human comfort in hot climates, temperature, thermal conduction and resistance, radiation, emissive, absorptive, and reflectivity transparency. In other sections of this chapter we learn about thermal convection, atmospheric pressure, water vapour, cooling by evaporation, thermal gain, thermal loss, dynamic thermal equilibrium, heat-regulating mechanisms of human body, and measurement of conditions of human comfort.

The second part tends to natural energy and vernacular architecture. This part includes four chapters. In first chapter of this part – the third chapter of book – we can learn about architecture and comfort, architectural design for a comfortable microclimate, and building materials. Chapter four assigns to the sun factor, orientation, shading, facades, openings and the roof. Chapter five is in the wind factor in air movement, air movement by pressure differential, the Claustrum, the wind-escape, the Malquf, and the Badgir. As the sixth chapter we can know in the sun factor in air movement, air movement by convection, the courtyard house, the Takhtabush and traditional city layout and climate. For chapter seventh the humidity factor, the fountain and the Salsabil have been seen.
172 pages September 1986

A Green Vitruvius

Cover, A Green Vitruvius

Author: J. Owen Lewis

ISBN: 187393694X

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Two thousand years ago the Roman architect Marcus Vitruvius Pollio wrote the first book on architecture. It established the concept of the pattern book — showing design principles and solutions. This publication is today’s pattern book of green design.

Sustainable architecture offers more than simply environmental benefits. It creates place-sensitive buildings, a location-specific architecture responding to local climatic conditions and using local materials instead of global cookie-cutter solutions. It also offers better architectural quality with more natural and fewer artificial inputs. Less is more, and less is beautiful.

The book is divided into four sections, which structure advice according to the design and construction process, the issues to be considered, the strategies to be adopted and the elements of green design. A fifth section advises on design evaluation.

Sustainability is one of many considerations for the practicing architect. This book is for the experienced practitioner anywhere who wishes to make a more sustainable architecture whether or not they have yet acquired any particular expertise in the subject. It will also serve as a valuable introduction to the subject, and provide a clear and attractive text for students. Published in the United Kingdom.

176 pages, 1999

… A Green Vitruvius is a wonderful resource that certainly lives up to its subtitle … Environmental Building News

The Temple in the House: Finding the Sacred in Everyday Architecture

The Temple in the House: Finding the Sacred in Everyday Architecture

Author(s): Anthony Lawlor

Publisher: J P Tarcher

Paperback: 240 pages

ISBN: 0874777771

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Illustrated with more than 175 photos and renderings, this book shows how the spaces we inhabit, from our public streets to our homes, can transform us. An award-winning architect identifies the fundamental design forms that have evoked a spiritual response throughout time, and relates these patterns to the elemental patterns of human awareness. Each chapter offers exercises and practical suggestions.

Customer Comments

Brian O’Connor , 04/17/97, rating=10:
Lawlor puts into words the transcendence that I have experienced in involving myself in the construction of a dwelling, but have been unable to adequately express in words to others. His intertwining Eastern, American Indian and Western philosophical expressions into the architectural expression of our inner experiences makes a connection for me that furthers my understanding of my experiences in defining space, through conception, design and construction.

Table of Contents
Introduction
Pt. 1. The Temple of Mind, Body, and Environment
1. Spirit and Mortar
2. Gate, Path, Lotus Seat
3. Steeple and Sanctuary
4. The Eight Elemental Forms
5. Mind, Body, Architecture
6. Sunlight and Renewal
Pt. 2. Dwelling in the Sacred
7. Making a Sacred Place
8. The Sacred City
9. A Sacred World
Acknowledgments
List of Illustrations
Bibliography
Index

How Buildings Learn : What Happens After They’re Built

Cover, How Buildings Learn : What Happens After They're Built

Author(s): Stewart Brand

Publisher: Penguin USA (Paper)

ISBN: 0140139966

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Reprint Edition
Paperback Publication date: October 1995

From Kirkus Reviews , 04/15/94:
Brand, founder of The Whole Earth Catalog and CoEvolution Quarterly, launches a populist attack on rarefied architectural conventions. A hippy elder statesman (once one of Ken Kesey’s Merry Pranksters), Brand argues that a building can “grow” and should be treated as a “Darwinian mechanism,” something that adapts over time to meet certain changing needs. His humanistic insights grew out of a university seminar he taught in 1988. Catchy anti- establishment phrases abound: “Function reforms form, perpetually,” or “Form follows funding.” Thomas Jefferson, a “high road” builder, is shown to have tinkered his Monticello into a masterpiece over a lifetime. Commercial structures, Brand says, are “forever metamorphic,” as a garage-turned-boutique demonstrates. Photo spreads with smart and chatty captions trace the evolutions of buildings as they adopt new “skins.” Pointedly, architects Sir Richard Rogers (designer of the Pompidou Centre in Paris) and I.M. Pei (the Wiesner Building, aka the Media Lab at MIT) are taken to task for designing monumental flops that deny occupants’ needs. Later sections track the social meanings of preservationism and celebrate vernacular traditions worldwide (e.g., the Malay house of Malaysia; pueblo architecture; the 18th- century Cape Cod House). Brand also documents his own unique habitats. He lives with his wife in a converted tugboat and houses his library in a metal self-storage container. Here, as throughout, Brand’s self-reliant voice rings true–that of an engaging, intellectual crank. Brand makes a case for letting people shape their own environments. His crunchy-granola insights bristle with an undeniable pragmatism. — Copyright ©1994, Kirkus Associates, LP. All rights reserved.

Synopsis:
All kinds of structures–domestic, commercial, institutional–are examined as they change with time and with varied usage in this fascinating, vividly accessible book that beckons toward a new frontier in architecture. 340 illustrations and photos.

Like people, buildings change with age, forced to adapt to the needs of current occupations. This provocative examination of buildings that have adapted well, and some that haven’t, calls for a dramatic rethinking in the way new buildings are designed, one that allows structures to grow and change easily with the environment. Photos.

Booknews, Inc. , 12/01/94:
Kind of like the theory that a literary text is never closed, but is temporarily appropriated in its reading and rereading, Brand, of Whole Earth Catalog fame, proposes that buildings adapt best when constantly refined and reshaped by their occupants, and that architects can grow from artists of space into artists of time. As a resource or just as a read, Brand shows how to work with time rather than against it. He provides loads of examples and loads of photographs and drawings. 11×8.75 Annotation copyright Book News, Inc. Portland, Or.

The author, Stewart Brand , 07/26/97:
Now a BBC TV series In July 97 the BBC aired a 6-part TV series called How Buildings Learn. I was the writer and presenter. It got lovely reviews in the Brit press. I hope it gets picked up for US broadcast. A British edition of the book (from Orion Books) came out at the same time as the TV series. It’s better manufactured than the US edition from Penguin, so the 350 photos read more clearly. You can probably get a copy from Blackwells on the Web. Maybe Amazon will pick up the Brit edition as well? However, the US edition has some harsh comments about buildings by architect Richard Rogers that were expunged from the British edition because he is aggressively litigious about all criticism.

Customer Comments

from Toronto, Canada , 10/09/97, rating=10:
excellent, thought-provoking, calm I’ve hesitated to review this book because I’m personally suspicious of glowing praise. However, this book deserves it. Brand’s starting point is the observation that most architects spend most of their time re-working or extending existing buildings, rather than creating new ones from scratch, but the subject of how buildings change (or, to adopt Brand’s metaphor, how buildings learn from their use and environment) is ignored by most architectural schools and theorists. By looking at examples (big and small, ancient and modern), Brand teases out patterns of re-use and change, and argues (very convincingly) that since buildings are going to be modified many times, they should be designed with unanticipated future changes in mind. Of course, the same is true of programs, and I found again and again that I could substitute the word program for building, and programmer for architect, everything Brand said was true of computing as well (but much better written than any software engineering polemic I’ve ever read).

04/03/97, rating=9:
Explores Architecture and Change I learned of this book while previewing a presentation by a superior software professional working to come up with some principles and ideas for building flexible systems, and whose son (an architecture student) had sent a copy to her. Several metaphors that she included, taken from the book, were so compelling I had to buy a copy immediately. The book turns out to be interesting on many levels, interesting about buildings, unintentionally full of metaphors for software geeks like me, intriguing about what happens when concrete and steel meet the realities of change and human nature. Now if I could only find a book about How People Learn…

02/16/97, rating=9:
A must for architects and preservationists This book is one of my required texts for my master’s degree in historic preservation. Preservationists are often overly concerned with restoring buildings to a specific period and this book should change their minds! The concept of a building as a living breathing CHANGING entity is something that anyone involved with buildings should take to heart. Brand’s book is well written and easy to read, and anyone who has ever been in love with a building should read it!

08/08/96, rating=8:
Very much in the tradition of A PATTERN LANGUAGE (Chris Alexander et al), about how building evolve through remodeling over the decades. Several excerpts: Art begets fashion; fashion means style; style is made of illusion; and illusion is no friend to function…. Formerly stylish clothing you can throw or give away; a building goes on looking ever more out-of-it, decade after decade, until a new skin is grafted on at great expense, and the cycle begins again–months of glory, years of shame…. Real estate is an astonishingly unexamined phenomenon. Books on the history of architecture outnumber books on the history of real estate 1,000 to 0, yet real estate has vastly more influence on the shape and fate of buildings than architectural theories of aesthetics.

Audubon House – Building the Environmentally Responsible, Energy-Efficient Office

Audubon House: Building the Environmentally Responsible, Energy-Efficient OfficePublisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 0471024961

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Synopsis:
The behind-the-scenes story of the construction of one of the world’s most environmentally sound buildings in the heart of New York City–the headquarters of the Audubon Society. Audubon and the Croxton architects sought to make Audubon House a model for design professionals around the world.

Card catalog description
Audubon House is the inspiring story of how the Audubon/Croxton team converted a 19th-century architectural masterpiece into one of the most environmentally advanced buildings ever designed. Providing a model that can be followed by owners, developers, architects, and building professionals, this book demonstrates how environmental criteria, such as sustainable use of resources, energy efficiency, and air quality can be achieved without sacrificing traditional considerations of cost, functionality, and aesthetics. Built at market cost and using only off-the-shelf technology, Audubon House is sixty percent more energy efficient than the conventional approach would have been. It saves its owners a projected $100,000 dollars annually in operating expenses, and supports an extraordinarily practical, healthy, and handsome office environment. The book is organized into two parts. Part I introduces the project and describes what members of the Audubon team discovered about the environmental impact of buildings and the types of systems that can mitigate this impact. Part II presents four essential systems at Audubon House: lighting, heating and cooling, ventilation and indoor air quality, and recycling. Particular attention is paid to the way in which these systems work together, each contributing to the performance of the whole. These goals could only be realized through the close cooperation of the architects, interior designers, environmentalists, engineers, research scientists, and contractors who collaborated on the project. The description of this collaborative process is as central to the theme of this book as the building’s many design innovations and energy-saving features. Richly illustrated with professional photographs and architectural drawings, Audubon House is both a guidepost for environmentally sound construction and an inspiring chronicle of hope for all environmentally concerned citizens.

The publisher, John Wiley & Sons:
In 1992, the National Audubon Society completed construction on one of the most environmentally advanced edifices ever built. The building’s success is due equally to the new technologies implemented, sound economic principles used to guide the project and the special collaborative approach of the design and construction team. This lavishly illustrated book examines all three elements in a manner that will show others how these principles can be applied to create buildings with improved environmental performance.

Table of Contents

TOWARD A SUSTAINABLE ARCHITECTURE
The Built Environment: Counting the Costs
Dimensions of Sustainable Design

INSIDE AUDUBON HOUSE
Lighting and Other Energy Efficiencies
Heating, Cooling, and Energy at Audubon
The Healthy Workplace: Ventilation and Materials
Recycling at Audubon: Closing the Loop
Conclusion: A Success in the Making
Appendices
Index.

Fine Homebuilding on Exterior Finishing : Siding, Roofs, Decks and Porches

Publisher: Taunton Press

ISBN: 1561580538

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Fine Homebuilding on Exterior Finishing : Siding, Roofs, Decks and Porches

Paperbound
Color photos, diagrams.
128 pages

Twenty-five articles from Fine Homebuilding magazine cover nearly every exterior project or problem, from siding, painting and flashing to gutter replacement, deck building and stair construction.

The Timeless Way of Building

The Timeless Way of BuildingAuthor(s): Christopher Alexander

Publisher: Oxford Univ Press

ISBN: 0195024028

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The Timeless Way of Building

A breathtaking and profound book. It is amazing how a book that propounds revolutionary architectural theory has stirred up the computer software industry. This deeply philosophical book, which is very practical and rigorous, lays the foundation for developing pattern languages. The book is all about a common language that can be shared to build artifacts that are alive. It stresses that a design should always concentrate on the whole and not on assembling parts. It also shows the power of distributed processing, if you will, as against centralized processing. All the great principles have one thing in common. They are simple. And, after one realizes such a simple but profound principle, one can not stop wondering how one survived without its knowledge. This book gives that feeling. If you are involved in architecture of any sort- buildings, software, organization or even politics- this book is a must for you.